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What is a Literary Canon?

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❶I have no clue what you mean by "our current literary canon".

Definition of Canon

Canon: Dictionary Definitions
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Literary Canon Defined

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The term “canon” is also confused with a homonym “cannon,” which means “a military weapon.” Difference Between Canon and Apocrypha. Apocrypha is also a literary term, which means “hidden,” or “anonymous literary pieces,” which were considered not to have confirmed to the rules set by the written Bible, in Hebrew or in Latin.

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The literary canon is a collection of works by which others are measured in terms of literary skill and value. Derived from the Greek kanôn ('straight rod'), the term 'canon' has been used to classify works belonging to either a particular tradition (i.e. Biblical) or author (i.e. Shakespearean).

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Sep 07,  · The term "literary canon" refers to a classification of literature. It is a term used widely to refer to a group of literary works that are considered the most important of a . In fiction and literature, the canon is the collection of works considered representative of a period or genre. The collected works of William Shakespeare, for instance, would be part of the canon of western literature, since his writing and writing style has had a significant impact on nearly all.

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A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field: "the durable canon of American short fiction" (William Styron). b. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic: the entire Shakespeare canon. As the term is ordinarily used, "literary canon" is defined by definition #7 above: "an authoritative list, as of the works of an author." Yet the sense of definition #3 ("standard, criterion") is also strongly implied as the means by which individual works find their way into the literary canon.